Past Winterthur Research Fellows

2015-2016

 
  • (NEH) Laura Turner Igoe, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ; American art history -- “Art and Ecology in the Early Republic.”
  • (NEH) Andrea Pappas, Associate Professor of Art History, Santa Clara University, Santa Clara, CA; American art -- “Embroidering the Landscape in Early America.”
  • Mary C. Beaudry, Professor of Archaeology, Anthropology, and Gastronomy, Boston University, Boston, MA; Historical archaeology, material culture studies, food & foodways -- “Gastronomical Archaeology: Food, Materiality, and the Aesthetics of Dining.”
  • Nicole Belolan, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Delaware, Newark, DE; History of American Civilization -- “Navigating the World: The Material Culture of Physical Mobility Impairment in the Early American North, 1700-1861.”
  • Carla Cevasco, Ph.D Candidate, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA; American Studies -- “Feast, Fast, and Flesh: The Violence of Hunger in Colonial New England and New France.”
  • Ben Davidson, Ph.D. Candidate, New York University, New York, NY; United States History -- “Freedom’s Generation: Coming of Age in the Era of Emancipation.”
  • Lynn Edgar, Independent Researcher, Glenmont, NY; Eighteenth-Century Children’s Clothing -- “Bespoke Children’s Clothing: Evidence of Children’s Clothing in 18th Century Tailor’s Daybooks.”
  • Jeannine Falino, Adjunct Curator, Museum of Arts and Design, New York, NY; American decorative arts, colonial  to contemporary -- “Gilded Age in America.” 
  • Katrina E. Greene, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Delaware, Newark DE; Art History -- “Modern American Intermediality, 1880-1930: Painting, Etching, Photography, Sculpture, Textiles.”
  • Diana Greenwald, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; Economic & Social History -- “Distinction and Development: Economic and Social Determinants of Artistic Taste in the United States, 1830-1880.”
  • Kerry Hackett, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Central Lancashire, Lancashire, United Kingdom; Department of Health -- “Shaker medicine in New York State: 1815-1860.”
  • Amy E. Hughes, Associate Professor and Deputy Chair for Graduate Studies, Brooklyn College, City University New York, Brooklyn, NY; Department of Theatre, Theatre History and Criticism -- “An Actor’s Tale: Theater, Culture, and Everyday Life in Nineteenth-Century America.”
  • Elizabeth Keslacy Ph.D. Candidate, University of Michigan, Institute for the Humanities, Ann Arbor, MI; Architectural history/theory, museology, history of ideas in architecture -- “A New Kind of Design: The Cooper-Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum (1896-1976).”
  • Rebecca J. Keyel, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI; Design Studies -- “Knitting for Victory: Women’s Volunteerism in the World Wars.”
  • Michael “Mookie” Kideckel, Ph.D. Candidate, Columbia University, New York, NY; History -- “When Food Became Natural: Industrial Food Culture and the Marketing of Reform.”
  • Cecilia Macheski, Professor Emerita, LaGuardia Community College, The City University of New York; English -- “Transporting Venice: Americans Abroad 1865-1940.”
  • Thomas Luke Manget, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Georgia, Athens, GA;  Environmental History, Appalachian History -- “Root Diggers and Herb Gatherers: An Environmental History of the Botanical Drug Industry in the United States.”
  • Chantal Meslin-Perrier, Conservateur Général du Patrimoine, Chercheur associé à l’INHA, Institut National d’Histoire de l’Art, Paris, France; European decorative arts, and the arts of the table -- “The Art of Dining in the United States from the 17th Century up to 1936.”
  • Katherine Miller, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA; American Architectural History -- “Ammi B. Young and the U. S. Office of the Supervising Architect, 1852-62.”
  • Michael Nix, Independent Researcher, Norwich, United Kingdom -- “Norwich textiles and the transatlantic trade with North America, 1750–1820.”
  • Laura Ping, Ph.D. Candidate, The Graduate Center, City University of New York, New York, NY; American history -- “Throwing off ‘the Drapery:’ Women and the Bloomer Costume, 1820- 1900.”
  • Laura Soderberg, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; English Literature -- “Vicious Infants: Antisocial Childhoods and the Politics of Population in the Antebellum United States.”
  • Sarah Templier, Ph.D. Candidate, Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, MD; History, Eighteenth-century American and Atlantic History  -- “Between Merchants, Shopkeepers, Tailors and Thieves: Circulating and Consuming Clothes, Textiles and Fashion in Eighteenth-Century North America.”
  • Margaret A. Toth, Associate Professor of English, Manhattan College, Bronx, NY;  U.S. Literature and Material Culture -- “Bric-a-brac and Textiles: Consumer Orientalism at the Turn into the Twentieth Century.”
  • Amy C. Wallace, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Department of Art, History of Art -- “Towards a Unity of the Arts and Life: Artistic Communities in the United States, 1870–1930.” 
  • Katherine Wheeler, Assistant Professor of Practice, University of Miami School of Architecture, Coral Gables, FL; Architectural History of the 19th and 20th centuries with specialty in architectural drawings and architectural practice -- “Graphic Intercessors: The Architectural Working Drawing.”
  • Edward E. Wise III, Independent Scholar, Taos, NM -- “The Maverick’s Maverick: Hervey White and the Spirit of Woodstock.

 


2014-2015

 

  • (NEH) Katherine Fama, Ph.D., John F. Kennedy School of North-American Studies, Free University Berlin, and Washington University, St. Louis, English and American literature -- “The Literary Architecture of Singleness: American Fiction and the Production of Women’s Independent Space, 1880-1929.”
  • Zara Anishanslin, Assistant Professor, City University of New York (College of Staten Island), history -- “Producing Revolution: The Material and Visual Culture of Making and Remembering the American Revolution.” 
  • Nicole Belolan, Ph. D. candidate, University of Delaware, history -- “Navigating the World: The Material Culture of Physical Mobility Impairment in the Early American North, 1700-1861.”
  • Claire Louise Blakey, Assistant Curator of Ceramics, The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Great Britain -- “Bringing China to Stoke-on-Trent: A Collection of Early 20th-Century Porcelain at the Potteries Museum & Art Gallery.”
  • Alison Boyd, Ph.D candidate, Northwestern University, art history -- “Ensemble Modernism: Orchestrating Art and People at the Barnes Foundation.”
  • Jennifer Chuong, Graduate student, Harvard University, history of art and architecture -- “Glass as Supplemental Architecture in Early America.”
  • Amber M. Clawson, Graduate research assistant, Middle Tennessee State University, public history -- “Symbols of America’s “Backcountry” Republic: Tennessee’s “Rope and Tassel” Furniture.”
  • Michael D’Alessandro, Ph.D. candidate, Boston University, American studies -- “Staged Readings: Sensationalism and Class in Popular American Literature and Theatre, 1835-1875.”
  • Jennifer Dorsey, Associate Professor of History, Siena College, Loudonville, NY -- “Tending the Empire: The Life of George Holcomb (1791-1856).”
  • Heidi Louise Egginton, Graduate student, Newnham College, University of Cambridge -- “Cultures of Amateur Antique and Curio Collecting in Britain, c.1868-1939.”
  •  Lydia Garver, Ph.D., Indiana University, Bloomington, historical archaeology -- “The Pastor’s House.”
  • Ann Martin, Stanley and Polly Stone (Chipstone) Professor and Director, Material Culture  Program, University of Wisconsin, Madison -- “Banish the Night: Domestic Illumination and Reflection before the Light Bulb.”
  • Cheryl-Lynn May, Curatorial Assistant, Wexner Center for the Arts, The Ohio State University -- “Undressing the Dressed Portrait Miniature: The History, Context, and Significance of Eighteenth- and Ninetheenth- Century Collage Portraiture,” one month, tenure to be determined.
  • Christina Michelson, Ph.D. student, University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, art history -- “Prints & Personalization: Negotiating Reproducibility and Uniqueness in the Nineteenth-Century American Home.”
  • Audrey Millet, Ph.D. student, University Paris 8 and University Neuchâtel, Switzerland -- “Towards a Global History of the “Factory Design”: Draughtsmen between Europe and the North American East Coast in the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries.”
  • Lauren Palmor, Ph.D. candidate, University of Washington, art history -- “Visualizing Age in Victorian Britain and America: A Typological Survey,”
  • William Riehm, Assistant Professor, Mississippi State University, interior design -- “ ‘In-between’ Creole and Anglo-American: Material Culture following the Louisiana Purchase.”
  • Karen L. Sanchez-Eppler, Stanton Williams 1941 Professor of American Studies and English, Amherst College -- “In the Archives of Childhood: Personal and Historical Pasts.”
  • Amber Shaw, Assistant Professor, Coe College, Iowa City, English -- “The Fabric of the Nation: Textiles, Nationhood, and Identity in the Mid-Nineteenth Century.”
  • Julia A. Sienkewicz, Assistant Professor, Duquesne University, art history -- “Epic Landscapes: Benjamin Henry Latrobe’s Virginian Watercolors, 1795-1799.”
  • D. Albert Soeffing, Independent Scholar -- “The Career of Allen Leonard, Artist, Silversmith and Die-Sinker and His Production of American Architectural Card Cases: Social Aspects of Visiting Card Culture in Nineteenth-Century America.”
  • Whitney Stewart, Ph.D. Candidate, Rice University, history -- “The Politics of Black Womanhood in the Nineteenth Century.”
  • Jennifer Streb, Associate Professor & Curator, Juniata College Museum of Art, Juniata College, Huntingdon, PA, art and art history -- “The Art and Science of Portrait Miniatures.”
  • Yolanda Theunissen, Curator, Osher Map Library, and Director, Smith Center for Cartographic Education, University of Southern Maine -- “Mastering Spatial Literacy with Pictorial Maps, Games and Toys from 1750 to the Present.”
  • Emily (Amy) Torbert, Ph.D. candidate, University of Delaware, art history -- Going Places: The Material and Imaginary Geographies of Prints in the Atlantic World, 1770-1840.”
  • Rachel Zimmerman, Ph.D. candidate, University of Delaware, art history -- “Global Luxuries: Art and Material Culture in the Eighteenth-Century Elite Home in Minas Gerais, Brazil.”

2013-2014

 

  • (NEH) Kirin Makker, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Architectural Studies Department -- “The Myths of Main Street.”
  • Amanda Casper, University of Delaware, Department of History -- “Home Alteration in Industrial Philadelphia, 1865 to 1925.” 
  • Michael Clapper, Associate Professor of Art History, Franklin & Marshall College, Art and Art History Department -- “Popular Art in America: Mass Reproduction and Middle-Class Taste.” 
  • William L. Coleman, University of California, Berkeley, History of Art Department -- “Thomas Cole’s Buildings: Architecture in Painting and Practice in the Early Republic.”
  • Erin Corrales-Diaz, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Department of Art History “Remembering the Veteran: Disability, Trauma and the American Civil War, 1861-1915.” 
  • Laurel Daen, College of William and Mary, Department of History -- “Civic Capacity and the Constitution of Disability in the Early American Republic.”
  • Alice Dolan, University of Hertfordshire, School of Humanities -- “Linen and Human Life Cycles: Everyday Experience in England, c. 1680-1810.”
  • Patricia Edmonson, Intergenerational Interpretation Specialist, The Cleveland Museum of Art -- “Art & Industry: The Art-in-Trades Club of New York.”
  • Rebecca Lee Fifield, Collections Manager, Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, Metropolitan Museum of Art -- “Lately Imported: Dress and Self-Fashioning of Female Indentured and Enslaved Servants, 1750-1790” and “The American Institute of Conservation’s Collection Care Network.” 
  • Javier Grossutti, Independent Scholar, Department of Humanities, University of Trieste, -- “The Herter Brothers Firm and the Introduction of Marble Mosaic in America.”
  • Thomas A. Guiler, Syracuse University, Department of History -- “The Handcrafted Utopia: Arts and Crafts Communities in America’s Progressive Era.”
  • Mary Ann Haagen, Visiting Scholar, Dartmouth College, Music Department -- “The New Hampshire Shakers on Trial, 1848-1849.”
  • Leonie Hannan, Teaching Fellow, University College London, History Department -- “Material Matters: The Early Modern Home as a Site for Scientific Enquiry.”  
  • Christine Henderson, English Department, University of Connecticut -- “The American Literary Imagination & World’s Fairs: 1851-1909.” 
  • Martha Libster, Professor of Nursing, Governors State University -- “Near and Dear Sisters – The Spirit of Nursing in Antebellum Shaker Communities.”
  • Christopher J. Lukasik, Associate Professor of English and American Studies, Purdue University, Department of English -- “The Image in the Text.” 
  • Anna O. Marley, Curator of Historical American Art, Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art -- “American Impressionism and the Garden, 1889-1920.”
  • John Murphy, Northwestern University, Department of Art History -- “Comrades in Craft: Arts and Crafts Colonies in the United States, 1896-1916.” 
  • Jeff Peachey, Independent Book Conservator -- “In-board Bindings and the Beginning of Industrialized Bookbinding in America and England, 1800-1840.”
  • M. Christina Roberts, Registrar, The Fabric Workshop and Museum, Philadelphia -- “Plant to Print: Modern Methods for the Cultivation and Production of Natural Dyes.”
  • Alexandra Socarides, Assistant Professor, University of Missouri, Department of English -- “The Lyric Pose: Antebellum American Women’s Poetry and the Problem of Recovery.”
  •  Rachel A. Snell, University of Maine, Department of History -- “ ‘Woman’s sphere is wherever she makes good’: Domesticity and Anglo-American Women’s Roles, 1790-1860.”
  • Erin Sweeney, University of California, Irvine, Department of English -- “Dwelling in Possibility: Spatial Practice and Innovation in the Nineteenth Century American Novel.”
  • Kristina Taketomo, University of Pennsylvania, History Department -- “Cold, White, and Clean: American Aesthetics and the Modern Refrigerator.”
  • Eric Weichel, graduate student, Art History Department, Queen’s University, Ontario -- “Whether France Will Be Concerned in It or Not”: Francophilia and Polyculturalism in the Visual and Material Culture of Eighteenth-Century British North America.”

 


2012-2013

 

  • (NEH) Ellen Avitts, University of Central Washington, Department of Art History -- “’Doesn’t It Look Like a Happy Place to Live?’  House Merchandising and Ideas of Home.”
  • (NEH) Wendy Bellion, University of Delaware, Department of Art History -- “What Statues Remember: Sculpture and Iconoclasm in American History.” 
  • Gretchen Voter Abbott, Rutgers University -- “Nineteenth Century Women’s Experiences of Aging in the United States.”
  • Christopher P. Barton, Temple University, Department of Anthropology -- “Identity and Improvisation: the Archaeology of Consumption at the African American Community of Timbuctoo, NJ.” 
  • Lynne Zacek Bassett, Independent Curator, American Museum of Textile History -- “American Dress in the Romantic Era, 1810-1860.” 
  • Sarah Beetham, University of Delaware, Department of Art History -- “Sculpting the Citizen Soldier: Reproduction and National Memory, 1865-1917.”
  • Xavier Bonnet, Independent Upholsterer and Upholstery Historian -- “From Paris to Philadelphia: Georges Bertault (1733/ ?); A Major Protagonist for Introduction of French Upholstery Taste and Techniques in late 18th-century America.” 
  • Alena Buis, Queens University (Canada), Art History Department -- “Homeliness and Worldliness: Domestic Material Culture in New Netherland and New York, 1600-1725.” 
  • Mara Caden, Yale University, Department of Art History -- “Making Imperial Capitalism: The Process of Manufactuing in the British Empire, 1696-1740.”
  • Noel Carmack, Utah State University, Art Department -- “Incidents in an Engineer's Life in the Far West: James R. Maxwell and the Union Pacific Railroad Survey.”
  • Amanda Casper, University of Delaware, Department of History -- “Making Home: Altering the Home in Industrial America, 1850-1950.” 
  • Justin Clark, University of Southern California, Art History Department -- “Training the Eye: Romantic Vision and Class Formation in Boston, 1830-1870.”
  •  Katelyn Crawford, University of Virginia, McIntire Department of Art and Art History -- “Itinerant Portraits in the Late Eighteenth-Century British Atlantic World.” 
  • Margaretta Frederick, Delaware Art Museum -- “‘Products of Artistic Effect’: The Lighting Designs of W.A.S. Benson.”
  • Emily C. Friedman, Auburn University, Department of English -- “Reading Smell in the Eighteenth-Century Novel.” 
  • Nancy Green, Cornell University, Herbert Johnson Museum of Art -- “Exhibiting Japan.” 
  • Stephen Hague, Linacre College, Oxford University, Department of History -- “The Gentleman’s House: Material Culture and Social Status in the British Atlantic World, 1680 – 1770.”
  • Kelli Jasper, University of Colorado-Boulder -- “Gathering Flowers: Romantic-Era Botanico-Literary Production and the Trans-Altantic Mediation of Culture.” 
  • Shana Klein, University of New Mexico, Department of History -- “The Fruits of America: Contextualizing Food in American Still-Life Representation, 1850-1900.” 
  • Jay Lemire, Bard Graduate Program -- “Vernay, Inc.: A Case Study of the Social History of the American Antiques Market, 1904-1940.”
  • James D. McMahon, Jr., Pennsylvania State University-Harrisburg, American Studies Program -- “The Swiss Bank House in Pennsylvania: Constructing Identity in  Eighteenth Century Pennsylvania German Rural Vernacular Architecture.”
  • Jennifer Burek Pierce, University of Iowa, School of Information and Library Science -- “Toward a History of the Role of Games and Toys in American Public Libraries.” 
  • Einav Rabinovitch-Fox, New York University, Department of History -- “This is What a Feminist Looks Like: The Construction of the New Woman Imagery through Fashion and the Political Culture of American Feminism, 1890-1940,” 
  • Melinda Rabb, Brown University
  • Sarah Fayen Scarlett, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Art History -- “Taste and Space on College Avenue.”  
  • Ashli White, University of Miami, Department of History -- “Object Lessons of the Revolutionary Atlantic.” 
  • Clay Zuba, University of Delaware, Department of English -- “Unstable Images: Native American Representation and Imperial Identity, 1676-1861.” 

2011-2012

 

  • (NEH) Christian Koot, Towson University, Assistant Professor, History Department -- “The Merchant, the Map and Empire: Augustine Herrman’s America and Cross-Cultural Exchange, 1644-1673.”
  • (NEH) Chi-ming Yang, University of Pennsylvania, Assistant Professor, English Department -- “Global Culture and the Lives of Objects, 1600-1800.” 
  • Alexandra T. Anderson, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum/Parsons The New School for Design, School of Art and Design History and Theory -- “The Byrdcliffe Arts Colony: Landscape, Stewardship, and Aesthetics.” 
  • Anna Arabindan-Kesson, Yale University, Department of the History of Art -- “Threads of Empire: Art and The Cotton Trade in the Indian and Atlantic Ocean Worlds, 1780-1900.”
  • Kelly Arehart, College of William and Mary, Department of History -- “Give Up Your Dead: How Business, Technology and Society Separated Americans from their Dearly-Departed, 1790-1930.” 
  • Jennifer Betsworth, University of South Carolina, Public History Program -- “‘Then Came the Peaceful Invasion of the Northerners’: The Impact of Outsiders on Plantation Architecture in Georgetown County, South Carolina.” 
  • Susan Brandt, Temple University, Department of History -- “Gifted Women and Skilled Practitioners: Gender and Healing Authority in the Mid-Atlantic Region, 1740-1830.” 
  • Robyne E. Calvert, Glasgow School of Art, History of Architecture and Urban Studies -- “Fashioning the Artist: Artistic Dress in Britain and America, 1848-1914.”
  • Kathleen Daly, Boston University, American and New England Studies Program -- “Shapely Bodies: The Material Culture of Women’s Health, 1880-1920.” 
  • Frederika Eilers, McGill University, School of Architecture -- “Building Toys and Toying Buildings: Constructing (or domesticating) Children through Blocks, Dollhouses, and Playrooms.” 
  • Ernest Freeberg, University of Tennessee -- “Incandescent America: Electric Light and America’s Culture of Invention.” 
  • Kara French, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, Department of History -- “The Politics of Sexual Restraint: Debates over Chastity in America 1780-1850.” 
  • Janice E. Frisch, Indiana University, Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology -- “A Historical Study of Transatlantic Influences on the Emergence of the Block-Style Quilt in the United States.” 
  • Christian Goodwillie, Curator of  Special Collections, Hamilton College Library -- “Biography of Richard McMemar and Critical Edition of Isaac Young’s ‘Concise View.’”
  • Mazie Harris, Brown University, Department of History of Art and Architecture -- “Fancy Photography on Broadway, 1859-1882.” 
  • Erin Leary, University of Rochester, Department of Art and Art History -- “Sowing the Seeds of Nativism and Eugenics in Gardening and the Domestic Arts, 1893-1923.” 
  • Robyn McMillin, Independent Scholar -- “Science in the American Style, 1700 – 1800.” 
  • Jean Portell, Art conservator, retired -- “Biography of Sheldon and Caroline K. Keck.” 
  • Josh Probert, University of Delaware, Department of History -- “Gilded Religion in the Age of Tiffany.” 
  • Melinda Rabb, Brown University, Department of English -- “Mimesis Reconsidered: Miniaturization in Eighteenth-Century Literature and Culture.” 
  • Sara Rivers Cofield, Maryland Archaeological conservation laboratory at Jefferson Patterson Park and Museum -- “Bridles, Bosses, Saddles, and Spurs: Interpreting Colonial Horse Equipage in the Archaeological Record.” 
  • Nancy Siegel, Towson University, Department of Art Design -- “Political Appetites: Revolution, Taste, and Culinary Activism in the Early Republic.” 
  • Sally Tuckett, University of Edinburgh, Department of History -- “Heritage and Design: Scottish Influences on Textiles and Clothing in Nineteenth-Century America.” 
  • Catherine Walsh, University of Delaware, Art History Department -- “Tell Me a Story: Narrative and Orality in Nineteenth-Century American Visual Culture.” 
  • Emilie Johnson Wheeler, University of Virginia, Department of Art and Architectural History -- “The Great House and Beyond: Plantation Complexes and Networks in the Antebellum Deep South.”
  • Virginia J. Whelan, Textile conservator in private practice -- “A Survey of Original Frame Styles for Philadelphia Needlework (1725-1830).” 
  • Kemble Widmer, Independent scholar -- “The Nathaniel Gould Ledgers.” 

 


2010-2011

 

  • (NEH) Anna M. Dempsey, University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, Art History Department -- “Working Women Artists: Images of Domesticity and the Construction of American Modernism, 1880-1930.” 
  • (NEH) Jennifer Van Horn, Smithsonian/Corcoran History of Decorative Arts -- “The Object of Civility and the Art of Politeness in British America.” 
  • Anne Anderson, University of Exeter (UK), School of English -- “‘A Backward Glance: Furnishing with Antiques in the Gilded Age and Beyond.”
  • Ashley Barnes, University of California, Berkeley, Department of English -- “An American Love Story: Narrative Ethics and the Novel from Stowe to James.
  • Jane F. Crosthwaite, Mount Holyoke College, Department of Religion -- “The Divine Book of Holy Mother Wisdom: Construction of a Shaker Sacred Text.” 
  • Christian DuComb, Brown University, Department of Theatre Arts and Performance Studies -- “From the Meschianza to the Mummers Parade: Racial and Gender Impersonation in Philadelphia.” 
  • Jennifer D. Elliott, University of Virginia, McIntire Department of Art -- “The Neoclassical Backcountry: Architecture, Material Culture and Hybrid Identities in the American South, 1780-1830.” 
  • Ross Fox, Royal Ontario Museum, Early Canadian Decorative Arts -- “Exploring Relationships in Construction and Design Among the Furniture of New England, New York and Montreal, 1790-1820.” 
  • Vanessa Habib, Independent Scholar -- “Transatlantic Craftsmanship: Scotch Carpets in the American Colonies.” 
  • Christina J. Hodge, Peabody Museum, Harvard University -- “A Genteel Revolution: Practical Refinements of New England’s Middling Sorts.”
  • Sarah M. Iepson, Temple University, Tyler School of Art, -- “Postmortem Relationships: Death and the Child in Antebellum American Visual Culture.” 
  • Sarah Keyes, University of Southern California, Department of History -- “Circling Back: Migration to the Pacific and the Reconfiguration of America, 1820-1900.” 
  • Melanie Kiechle, Rutgers University, Department of History -- “The Air We Breathe: Nineteenth-Century Americans and the Search for Fresh Air.”
  • Alison M. K. Klaum, University of Delaware, Department of English -- “Pressing Flowers:  The Construction of Nature and the Preservation of Culture in Eighteenth- and Nineteenth-Century American Print.” 
  • Anca I. Lasc, University of Southern California, Department of Art History -- “Publishing the Interior in Nineteenth-Century Paris, 1852-1914.” 
  • Whitney A. Martinko, University of Virginia, Department of History -- “Progress through Preservation: History on the American Landscape in an Age of Improvement, 1790-1860.” 
  • Carol A. Medlicott, Northern Kentucky University, Department of History and Geography -- “Now By My Motion: the Life Journey of Issachar Bates.” 
  • Consuela G. (Chela) Metzger, University of Austin, School of Information -- “The Material Culture of Bound Record-keeping Structures in America before 1860.” 
  • Christopher C. Oliver, University of Virginia, McIntire Department of Art -- “Civic Visions: The Panorama and Popular Amusement in American Art and Society, 1845-1870.” 
  • Katie A. Pfohl, Harvard University, Department of the History of Art and Architecture -- “Abstraction’s Islamic Antecedents: American Modernism and Islamic Art, 1830-1930.” 
  • Madelyn Shaw, Independent Scholar for the American Textile History Museum -- “Homefront & Battlefield: The Civil War Through Quilts & Context.” 
  • David J. Silverman, George Washington University, Department of History -- “Thundersticks: Firearms and the Transformation of Native America.” 
  • Ryan K. Smith, Virginia Commonwealth University -- “Robert Morris’s Folly: The Architectural and Financial Failures of an American Founder.” 
  • Andrea M. Truitt, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Art History -- “Neither Inside nor Outside: Cozy Corners and Their Role as Intermediaries of Interiority.” 
  • Marie von Möller, Independent Scholar connected to Kunstmuseene, Bergen, Norway -- “Art History and Paintings Conservation in the Twentieth Century.” 
  • Bärbel Wöhlke, Technische Universität Dresden, Institute für Kunst- und Musikwissenschaft -- “From the Boy to the Man: Visualizing Masculinity in American Genre Paintings, 1800-1870.”  

2009-2010 

 

  • (NEH) Roderick McDonald, Professor of History, Rider University -- “The Ethnography and Pornography of Slavery: Dr. Jonathan Troup’s Journal of Dominica, 1789-1791.” 
  • (NEH) John Lardas Modern, Professor of Religious Studies, Franklin & Marshall College -- “Haunted Modernity; or, the Metaphysics of Secularism in Antebellum America.” 
  • Matthew Bailey, doctoral candidate, Washington University in St. Louis, Department of Art History and Archaeology -- “Materiality in American Painting.”
  • Alice Barnaby, doctoral candidate, University of Exeter (UK), Department of English -- “Cultural Practices of Illumination, 1780-1840.” 
  • Christina Bisulca, WUDPAC alum and doctoral candidate, University of Arizona, Department of Materials Science and Engineering --“Reconstructing a Lost N. C. Wyeth Illustration.”
  • Jennifer Black, doctoral candidate, University of Southern California, History Department -- “Branding Trust: Advertising, Legitimacy, and Trademarks in US Popular Culture, 1876-1930.” 
  • Michael Block, doctoral candidate, University of Southern California, Department of History -- “New England Merchants, the China Trade, and the Origins of California.”
  • Jennifer Carlquist, master’s degree candidate, Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum Program -- “The Antiquarian Career of J. A. Lloyd Hyde: Americana Business as Pleasure.”
  • Laurie Churchman, Assistant Professor of Fine Art, University of Pennsylvania -- “The Art and Craft of Sign Painting.”
  • Jennifer Egloff, doctoral candidate, New York University, History Department -- “Popular Numeracy in Early Modern England and British North America.” 
  • Robert P. Emlen, University Curator, Brown University -- “Picturing the Shakers: Illustrating Shaker Life in the Popular Press of Nineteenth-Century America.”
  • Ernest Freeburg, Associate Professor of History, University of Tennessee, Knoxville -- “Incandescent America: A Cultural History of the Light Bulb.” 
  • Christian Goodwillie, Curator of Rare Books and Special Collections, Hamilton College Library -- “Hancock Shaker Village Guidebook and Isaac Newton Young’s ‘Concise View.’” 
  • Margaret K. Hofer, WPAMC alum and Curator of Decorative Arts, The New-York Historical Society -- “Silver at The New-York Historical Society.” 
  • Abigail Lundelius, doctoral candidate, University of South Carolina -- “Shall We Gather at the Table?” 
  • Aaron McCullough, doctoral candidate, Michigan State University, American Studies Program -- “Masculine Interiors and Transnational Commodities, 1880-1920.” 
  • Tanya Pohrt, doctoral candidate, University of Delaware, Department of Art History -- “Touring Pictures: The Exhibition of American History Paintings in the Early Republic.”
  • Kate Smith, doctoral candidate, University of Warwick (UK), Department of History -- “Eighteenth-Century British Ceramics Industry – Ideas of Skill and Workmanship.” 
  • Arden Stern, doctoral candidate, University of California, Irvine, Department of Film and Media Studies -- “Slanted, Shredded, and Simulated: A Cultural History of the Unruly Typeface.”
  • Joseph Stubenrauch, doctoral candidate, University of Indiana, History Department -- “Faith in Goods: Evangelicalism, Materiality, and Consumer Culture in Nineteenth-Century Britain.”
  • Anne Verplanck, independent scholar -- “The Graphic Arts in Philadelphia, 1780-1880.” 

2008-2009
 

  • (NEH) Martin Bruckner, associate professor, University of Delaware -- “The Social Life of Maps in North America, 1690-1860”.  
  • (NEH) Chloe Wigston Smith, visiting assistant professor, University of Georgia -- “Practical Habits: Clothes, Gender, and the History of the Novel” 
  • (McNeil) Arthur McLendon, doctoral candidate, University of Virginia -- “Ye Living Building: Spirit, Space, and Ritual Encounter in Shaker Architecture”.  
  • (McNeil) Julia A. Sienkewicz, doctoral candidate, University of Illinois -- “Citizenship by Design: the Creation of Identity through Art, Architecture and Landscape in the Early Republic”. 
  • (McNeil) Janneken Smucker, doctoral candidate, University of Delaware -- “From Rags to Riches: Amish Quilts and the Crafting of Value”.  
  • Anne Anderson, research fellow, Exeter University -- “Chinamania”: American Collectors of Antique Ceramics, c. 1880-1930” 
  • Laura Beach, independent scholar and free-lance journalist -- “A Genius for the True and the Beautiful: Merchant Visionaries who Bought, Sold, and Saved America’s Past”. 
  • George Boudreau, associate professor of history and humanities, Penn State University -- “The Surest Foundation of Happiness: ‘Useful Knowledge,’ the Enlightenment, and the Cultural Transformation of Philadelphia”.  
  • David Brown, graduate student, The College of William and Mary -- “Time, Space, and Movement:  The Manor House and Gardens of Fairfield Plantation, Gloucester County, Virginia, 1694-1787”.
  • Sarah Carter, doctoral candidate, Harvard University -- “A Basket, A Needle, A Penknife:  Object Lessons in Nineteenth-Century American Material and Visual Culture”. 
  • Elise Ciregna, graduate student, University of Delaware -- “Ornamental Marble in America, 1750-1880”.
  • Mary Bryan Curd, faculty, Harrison Middleton University -- “Facing Death:  Portraits and Mourning Ritual in America, 1775-1850”. 
  • Catherine Holochwost, doctoral candidate, Art History Department, University of Delaware -- “Landscape as Machine:  Vision and Imagination in Nineteenth-Century American Painting”.  
  • Louisa Iarocci, assistant professor, University of Washington -- “Spaces of Selling: the Commercial City, the Mercantile House and the Department Store”.  
  • Jeffrey Kaja, doctoral candidate, University of Michigan -- “Transportation in Early Pennsylvania, 1675-1800”. 
  • Kimberly Kay Lamm, assistant professor, English, Critical and Visual Studies, Pratt Institute -- “Portraying, Displaying, and Disciplining the Girl in Nineteenth–Century America”.  
  • Carol Matthews, lecturer in history, United States Naval Academy -- “From the Heart of Mother Ann: Philemon Stewart’s Search for Obedience”.  
  • Cynthia Patterson, assistant professor, University of South Florida-Lakeland -- “Exclusively from Original Designs:  The Philadelphia Pictorials and the Graphic Arts”. 
  • Charlotte Rodabaugh, doctoral candidate, West Virginia University -- “Ambitious Brotherhood:  Yankee Masculinity and the American Frontier”. 
  • Teagan Schweitzer, doctoral candidate, University of Pennsylvania -- “Philadelphia Foodways ca.1750-1850:  An Historical Archaeology of Cuisine”.
  • Akiko Shimbo, independent scholar -- “Patterns and Identities:  Furniture Makers, Consumers, and the Design Process in England and America, c.1750-1850”. 
  • Nancy Siegel, assistant professor of art history, Juniata College -- “To Elevate the Mind:  Female Instruction, Women Artists, and the Hudson River School
  • Kelly Sisson, doctoral candidate, University of Michigan -- “King Corn in American Culture, 1862-1936”
  • Kevin Sweeney, professor of history and American studies, Amherst College -- “Guns in Early American Cultures:  The Use and Possession of Firearms in America, 1620-1820.” 
  • Megan Walsh, doctoral candidate, Temple University -- “Inconspicuous Consumption: Objects, Publics, and Visible Patriotism in Early American Literature, 1771-1798”. 

2007-2008

 

  • (NEH) Michelle Craig McDonald, Assistant Professor of Atlantic History, Richard Stockton College -- “Regional Reliance: Coffee, the Caribbean and the Early American Economy, 1765-1825”
  • (NEH) Jennifer Greenhill, Assistant Professor of American Art, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign -- “The Plague of Jocularity: Contesting Humor in Modern American Art”
  • (McNeil) Daniel Claro, Doctoral Candidate, History of American Civilization, University of Delaware -- “Bodies in Motion: Material Culture and the Experience of Mobility, 1800-1860”
  • (McNeil) Jakob Crockett, Doctoral Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of South Carolina -- “Mann-Simons African American Archaeology Project
  • Jhennifer Amundson, Associate Professor of Architecture, Judson College -- “Thomas U. Walter and the Founding of the Architecture Profession in the U.S.”
  • David Bjelajac, Professor of Art, George Washington University -- “Mercurial Pigments: Chymistry, Color Theory and Studio Practice in American Painting, 1720-1880”
  • Christian Carr, Assistant Professor of Arts Management and Museum Director, Sweet Briar College -- “Picturesque and Imposing: Sweet Briar House, 1851-1852”
  • Robert Crocker, Senior Lecturer, Louis Laybourne Smith School of Architecture and Design, University of South Australia -- “The Role of Furniture and Furnishing History in the Construction of Period Style Anglo-American Interiors, 1918-1939”
  • Kate Davies, Lecturer in English and American Literature, Newcastle University -- “Regional Fabric? Women, Silk and the Sense of Place in the Delaware Valley”
  • Joanna Frang, Doctoral Candidate in American History, Brandeis University -- “Early Americans on the Grand Tour”
  • Carole Glauber, Instructor, 20th Century History of Photography, Mt. Hood Community College -- “Eva Watson-Schutze: Her Years at Byrdcliffe”
  • Susanna Gold, Lecturer, Art History Department, Temple University -- “The Performance of Memory: Art, War, and Nation at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition”
  • Laurel Horton, Independent scholar -- “Kalmia Research: Early White Quilts and Coverlets”
  • Adam Jortner, Doctoral Candidate in American History, University of Virginia -- “A Political History of American Miracles, 1780-1838”
  • Martha Katz-Hyman, Independent curator -- “Doing Good While Doing Well: The Decision to Manufacture Products that Supported the Abolition of the Slave Trade,” Slavery and Abolition,  June, 2008.
  • Barbara Klempan, Assistant Professor of Art Conservation, Queen’s University, Canada -- “Importation and Use of Early Artists’ Materials in North America”
  • Zbigniew Lewicki, Professor of American Studies, University of Warsaw -- “From Thrift Society to Consumer Society: The Role of Advertising”
  • Carol Matthews, Adjunct Professor, U.S. Naval Academy -- “Dreams, Visions and Healings: Constructions of Prophetic Identity in Shaker Autobiography”
  • Arthur McLendon, Doctoral Candidate in American Art and Architecture, University of Virginia -- “Spirit, Space and Ritual Encounter in Shaker Architecture”
  • Marla Miller, Associate Professor of History, University of Massachusetts -- “True Colors: Betsy Ross and the Making of America”
  • Ruth Norton, Head of Conservation, Field Museum of Natural History -- “Use and Durability of Animal Hard Tissues in Artifacts”
  • Yvette Piggush, Doctoral Candidate in English, University of Chicago -- “Governing Imagination: American Social Romanticism, 1790-1840” 
  • Vincent Plescia, Independent scholar -- “Fused-Plate Dual-Air Current Burner Oil Lamps in the Winterthur Collection: Seeds of a Revolution in Artificial Lumination”
  • Katherine Turner, Doctoral Candidate in History, University of Delaware -- “Food and Cooking in America, 1880-1930”
  • William Wagner, Doctoral Candidate in History, University of California-Berkeley -- “Reading, Writing and Rambling: The Literary Culture of Travel in Antebellum America”

2006-2007

 

  • (NEH) Catherine Kelly, associate professor of history, University of Oklahoma -- “Things Useful and Ornamental:  The Aesthetics of Everyday Life in the Early Republic.”
  • (NEH) William Moore, assistant professor, Public History, University of North Carolina -- “Not-So-Simple Gifts:  The Image and Interpretation of the Shakers in America, 1925-1965.” AND "Interpreting the Shakers: Opening the Villages to the Public, 1955-1965". The Journal of Heritage Stewardship, Winter, 2006. 
  • (McNeil) Eric Gollanek, doctoral candidate in Art History, University of Delaware -- “Empire Follows Art:  Exchange and Visions of Empire in Britain and Its Colonies.”  
  • (McNeil) Anna Marley, doctoral candidate in Art History, University of Delaware -- “Rooms With a View:  The Topographic Landscape in the American Home, 1780-1820.”      
  • (McNeil) Katherine Rieder, doctoral candidate in American Civilization, Harvard University -- “The Remainder of Our Effects We Must Leave Behind:  American Loyalists and the Meaning of Things, 1765-1800.”  
  • Christian Goodwillie, curator, Hancock Shaker Village -- “Gather Up the Fragments:  The Andrews Shaker Collection.” 
  • Mario S. De Pillis and Christian Goodwillie, "Gather Up the Fragments: The Andrews Shaker Collection," Yale University Press, 2008, and traveling exhibition.
  • Joy Howard, doctoral student, English, Purdue University -- “The Patchwork of Race and Authority.”  
  • Sandra Soule, independent scholar -- “Robert White, Jr.:  A Brother Much Respected and Beloved. But Was He a Shaker?”        
  • Isabell Cserno, doctoral candidate in American Studies, University of Maryland -- “The Aesthetics of Race, Gender, and Nation in Advertising in the U.S. and Germany, 1880-1930.”   
  • Anna Hajdik, doctoral student in American Studies, University of Texas -- “Gentleman Farmer, Agriculture Industrialist:  Henry Francis du Pont and the Winterthur Farm.”   
  • Hannah Carlson, doctoral candidate in American Studies, Boston University -- “Pocket Narratives in American Dress.”  
  • Jennifer Criss, doctoral candidate in Art History, University of Pennsylvania -- “Japonisme and beyond in the art of Marie Bracquemond, Mary Cassatt, and Berthe Morisot, 1867—1895”. Dissertation, University of Pennsylvania, 2007. 
  • Lucia Curta, adjunct assistant professor of history, University of Florida -- “‘Imagined Communities’ in showcases:  the Nationality Rooms in Pittsburgh and the “period rooms” in Winterthur.” 
  • James del Prince, associate professor of floral design, Mississippi State University -- “Gilding the Lily:  Floral & Plant Containers of the 19th Century.”    
  • Sarah Gould, doctoral candidate in Program in American Culture, University of Michigan -- “Toys Make a Nation: Ethnic Imagery in Toys, 1840-1920.”  
  • Uriel Heyd, doctoral candidate in History, University of London -- “A Comparative Study of English and American Newspapers in the long 18th Century.”  
  • Michelle Mormul, doctoral candidate in History, University of Delaware -- “Philadelphia’s Linen Merchants, 1765-1815.”
  • Starr Siegele, adjunct curator, Allentown Art Museum -- “Parallel Patterns in Print:  Winterthur’s Early Printed Cottons in Context.”   
  • Laura Sprague, curator, Maine Historical Society -- “Furniture in Maine, 1750-1850.”   
  • Kevin Tucker, curator, Dallas Museum of Art -- “Gustav Stickley and the American Arts and crafts Movement.” Exhibition and catalog.
  • Jennifer Van Horn, doctoral candidate in Art History, University of Virginia -- “The Object of Civility and the Art of Politeness in British America.”  
  • Tamara Wilde, doctoral candidate in American Art History, University of Iowa -- “Virgins and Vixens:  Women, Musical Instruments and Identity in Gilded Age Art.”   

2005-2006

 

  • Zara Anishanslin-Bernhardt, University of Delaware -- "Portrait of More than a Lady: Fashioning American Identity Through Atlantic World Material Culture 1688-1790"
  • Jonathan Eacott, University of Michigan -- "Owning Empire: East Indian Goods in the Development of the Anglophone World, 1740-1830"
  • Chris Evans, University of Glamorgan -- “Iron marks as early brand names: Swedish iron in the Atlantic market during the eighteenth century”. 
  • (NEH) Lydia Fisher, University of Puget Sound -- "Domesticating the Nation: American Literature, Exceptionalism, and the Science of Cultivation"
  • Cynthia Fowler, Emmanuel College -- "Hooked Rugs in Early 20th–Century America"
  • Caroline Frank, Brown University -- "China as Object and Idea in the Making of an American Identity 1680-1820
  • Marie Frank, University of Massachusetts, Lowell -- "Pure Design and American Decorative Arts"
  • Nancy Green, Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University -- "Shared Dreams: Collaborative Partnerships of the Arts and Crafts Movement"
  • Harriette Hawkins, Independent Scholar -- "The Colonial Revival in New Jersey"
  • Bryn Hollenbeck, University of Delaware -- "To Nurture and Protect America's Modern Tots: The Material Culture of Childhood, 1900-1960s"
  • Ann Merrill Ingram, Davidson College -- "The Culture of Flowers in Nineteenth-Century America" 
  • Alison Isenberg, Rutgers University -- "Second Hand Cities: Antiques Dealers, Salvage Shops, and Revaluing the Past in the 20th Century"
  • Jonathan Massey, Syracuse University -- "Crystal and Arabesque: Claude Bragdon's Progressive Architecture" AND “Organic Architecture and Direct Democracy: Claude Bragdon’s Festivals of Song and Light.”
  • Barbara Mooney, University of Iowa -- "Learning Your Place: Race and Space in Jim Crow-Era Popular Culture"
  • Ewa Mroczek, Polish Academy of Science -- "Read From the Past: Historical-Aesthetical and Ideological-Background of a Modern American Toy"
  • Ruth Ann Penka, Independent Scholar -- "From Pencil to Plate: Creating a Transferred Version of 19th–Century American Art for American Consumers by English Staffordshire Potters"
  • Kyle Roberts, Georgetown University -- “Urban Evangelicals: Popular Religious Belief in New York City, 1783—1845”
  • Mary Schoeser, Central St. Martin's College of Art & Design, London -- "Meaning and Manufacture: Scottish Turkey red in North America 1780-1910"
  • Nancy Siegel, Juniata College Museum of Art -- "An Acquired Taste: Patriotic Imagery in the Home and the Shaping of a National Culinary Culture"
  • Starr Siegele, Allentown Art Museum -- "Early Narrative (Scenic) Printed Textiles Produced Before 1830"
  • Virginia Whelan, Independent Conservator -- "New Discoveries in Early American Needlework: The 'Tree of Life' Embroideries." AND “Discoveries in Philadelphia Needlework: the Tree of Life Embroideries.”

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