Due to inclement weather, tonight's Sin City concert has been rescheduled for July 15. For more information about our Music Along the Bank concert series, click here.

Lectures


Photo courtesy Monacelli Press


“Narratives of Manners and Style: The Houses of Cross & Cross”


Tuesday, May 19
6:00 pm, Copeland Lecture Hall

Join architect Peter Pennoyer and architectural historian Anne Walker, authors of the new book New York Transformed: The Architecture of Cross & Cross, for a look at two of the early 1900s’ most important but largely forgotten architects. Brothers John and Eliot Cross counted the country’s richest and most influential figures among their clients, yet they tended to gravitate toward an unpretentious luxury—a polite and historically embedded expression of their wealth. They designed several magnificent Colonial Revival houses in New York as well as country houses in fashionable areas such as Long Island’s North Shore and East End, Greenwich, Connecticut, and Far Hills, New Jersey. Most notably, they designed J. Watson and Electra Havemeyer Webb’s Brick House in Shelburne, Vermont (now part of the Shelburne Museum), Chestertown House in Southampton for H. F. du Pont, and the childhood home of famed decorator Sister Parish in Far Hills, New Jersey. Pennoyer and Walker will share gorgeous photos of these homes and insight into the people who lived there and will discuss the influences the Cross brothers used while designing each property. Members $5. Nonmembers $15. Book signing to follow.
 


 
1959 Cadillac convertible

Winterthur Invitational
Historic Autos Lectures

 

Saturday, May 23
1:00 pm

"The du Pont Family's 'garage'"

Join Maggie Lidz, estate historian, Winterthur, for a 30-minute walking lecture around the complex Winterthur building known as “The Coach House,” an 1840 barn rebuilt and repurposed continually over 100 years. Now best known as the site of our Post Office, in the past, it was used to stable horses, kennel dogs, and store coaches and automobiles. The stone work, building shape, and window and door frames tell the 100-year-old story of this once vital, but often overlooked, structure. Walking lecture starts at the Brown Horticulture Learning Center. Members free. Included with admission.

 

Saturday, May 30
1:00 pm, Copeland

"Cars and Color in the 1950s"

Gregory Landrey, director of Academic Affairs at Winterthur Museum, examines cars, colors, and advertising in the 1950s. He’ll discuss how color was used creatively on the vehicles themselves as well as in the advertisement of the product to entice the buyer in a highly competitive and rapidly evolving automotive industry. Drawing comparisons between fashions from the era and the marketing of automobiles, Mr. Landrey will highlight advertisements from various popular publications including Vogue, Esquire, Look, Life, The National Geographic, and others. Members free. Included with admission.


Maureen Footer, photo by Zev Starr-Tambour


“George Stacey and the Creation of American Chic”

Tuesday, June 9
6:00 pm, Copeland


Maureen Footer, ASID, will discuss trailblazing decorator George Stacey, who shot to prominence in the 1930s with projects for socialite Frances Cheney and style priestess Diana Vreeland. The audacity of his work caught the eye of Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Town and Country, and House & Garden. An appealing nonchalance and irreverence, combined with erudition, a flair for color, and an innate grasp of balance, scale, and proportion produced rooms that were surprising and sophisticated. Balancing modern aesthetics and modern living with a lifelong passion for French classicism ensured that Stacey's designs were both of the moment and enduring. For the next 40 years, he deftly produced a string of stylish rooms for his clientele. While Stacey’s approach remained constant, he captured the nuances of an exceptionally dynamic era and established a design vocabulary that defined American chic and endures to this day. Members $5. Nonmembers $15. Book signing to follow.


Museum of the American Revolution, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Taylor, Conserved with Funds Provided by the Pennsylvania Society of Sons of the Revolution and its Color Guard

A Colorful Folk Lecture Series

 

“Banners of Liberty: Flags of the American Revolution”

Sunday, June 14

12:15–1:15 pm, Copeland


This Flag Day presentation by Scott Stephenson, Museum of the American Revolution, examines Revolutionary War flags and the role of Pennsylvania Germans in the American Revolution. Following the lecture, from 1:30-3:00, there will be a special viewing of three rare flags in the Rotunda, including a Grand Division flag from the 8th Virginia Regiment, the Forster Flag from a Massachusetts militia regiment, and the thirteen-star Commander-in-Chief Standard that was part of General George Washington’s field equipment. Members free. Included with admission.

 

 

 


William Woys Weaver, photo by Rob Cardillo

“As American as Shoofly Pie: The Foodlore and Fakelore of Pennsylvania Dutch Cuisine”


Tuesday, June 23
6:00 pm, Copeland


Celebrated food historian and cookbook writer William Woys Weaver delves into the history of Pennsylvania Dutch cuisine to sort fact from fiction in the foodlore of this culture. Book signing follows lecture. $5 per Member. $15 per nonmember. Reservations encouraged.


Cutwork picture of two soldiers, attributed to the Sussel-Washington Artist, probably Lancaster County, PA, ca. 1776. Winterthur Museum 2013.31.102

“Enemy Captives in Revolutionary Lancaster, Pennsylvania, during the War for Independence”


Thursday, June 25
12:15 pm
, Rotunda
 

Washington College history professor and author Ken Miller explores revolutionary Pennsylvanians’ frustrating encounters with their earliest British prisoners during the first year of the Revolutionary War. Members free. Included with admission.
 


Mark Loudon, photo courtesy University Communications, University of Wisconsin–Madison

“The Language of Pennsylvania German Folk Art”

July 9, 12:15–1:15 pm


Traditionally, most Pennsylvania Germans were trilingual. Mark Louden, professor and co-director, Max Kade Institute for German-American Studies, University of Wisconsin–Madison, discusses the linguistic diversity of Pennsylvania German society, past and present, drawing on fraktur, textiles, and other objects from the Winterthur collection. Members free. Included with admission.


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